World Religions Quiz

24 07 2019

WhatsApp Image 2018-11-09 at 5.18.27 PM(10)How much do you know about world religions?

A Pew Forum study of nearly 11,000 Americans done this year found that most of us can’t even correctly answer half of a basic world religions survey.

Think you can beat the average? Take the survey here.

I thought I should take the challenge since I teach a World Religions class to high school students. I was relieved to get a perfect score. 🙂

Besides teaching, I am also involved daily with Muslims in Indonesia, and occasionally take time to chat on issues of faith with an online interfaith discussion group. I’ve learned a lot from those interactions that I never learned in books.

Here are my 3 takeaways from the survey results—

  • Most of us don’t know much about the beliefs of those of other religions.

In fact, as a Christian I’m embarrassed to say that in general, Jews, atheists and agnostics know more about others’ faiths than we Christians do.

Why? Pew Forum found that it wasn’t related to Jews, atheists and agnostics having higher education (though they do). I suspect that it comes down to who we choose to interact with and whether we’re willing to ask honest questions.

  • The #1 greatest factor discovered by Pew Forum backs up my theory: personally knowing people from other faiths is the single most significant determining factor as to understanding the beliefs of other faiths. Out of 32 questions on the full survey, those who only knew members of 0-3 other religions scored an average of 8.6 right answers. But those who knew members of 7-9 other religions scored a whopping 19.0 questions right, far above the average.
  • How this connects to peacemaking is also interesting—Pew Forum added a “feeling thermometer” of how respondents felt about those of other faiths. Not surprisingly, the more we know about another’s faith, the more warmly we feel toward them; and the less we know about their faith, the more cool or even suspicious we might feel toward them.

If we apply this principle to social issues such as the anti-Semitic graffiti in Santa Monica this week, or the 26 times mosques have been targeted in liberal, multi-cultural California in the last decade–with everything from arson to death threats to bomb threats to actually stabbing a worshiper–my guess is that whoever is behind such horrendous deeds has never tried to make a Jewish or Muslim friend.

While taking a World Religions class can be helpful, the most meaningful thing we can do toward building a world of understanding and peace is to make a friendship with someone who believes differently than we do.

Watch for opportunities this week—if your heart is open, you might be surprised at the situations God will bring across your path to meet someone different than you. Or if you’re really adventurous, go on a John 4:4 adventure, and intentionally go where people are different than you. Then write and tell me what happened!

[The complete summary of the Pew Forum survey can be found here.]





Peace Starts with the Youth

12 12 2017

 

This year I’ve had the privilege of teaching a World Religions class for high school seniors and juniors. We’re looking at all the major religions of the world, atheism, agnosticism, even the occult. My goal is that my students understand enough about each of these belief systems to start intelligent conversations with anyone in a way that is loving, honoring, friendly and bridge-building. I want them to learn how to share their faith in Jesus well, listen well, and love everybody well no matter how they feel about Jesus.

It’s so important that we start the process of peace with the young.

Here are some comments from my students—do you think they’re getting the point of the class?

 

To be honest, Mr. Baton’s World Religions class is one of my favorite classes. I learned a lot of things in his class. I learned so many facts about different religions that I had never ever heard or thought about, and that makes me want to know more about our almighty God. In World Religions class I also learned about how we can start a conversation with our other religion friends, and how to choose the right words to say to them to introduce them to Jesus.

After joining World Religions class, I began to understand how to respect other religions and to know how to treat them well. Also, I feel like I really want to know more about God, and to discover signposts to Jesus and God in all different religions. –Chris

Throughout the semester, I have learned various things from our World Religions class. One thing that was emphasized was how to effectively interact with people of different faiths. I learned that we Christians have to make connection points first before explaining our opinions or our belief systems. It is essential for us to make connections and build up a relationship before describing our beliefs. If we fail to make relationships, which will automatically lead us to a deeper level of conversation and spiritual talks, people of different faiths will not even open their ears to listen to what we say. Thus, it is very important that we make relationships first when approaching others with different religions. –Torres

This year was my first time taking a World Religions class and it has greatly opened up my eyes to the world around me. I’ve realized that people of other religions are simply just that, people. They aren’t evil, they aren’t bad people just because they do not believe in the God I believe in. Some have not had the opportunity to know about God while others are a specific religion because that’s all they know. For example, many Muslims are brought up in their Muslim family and community with Muslim friends. Everyone they know is a Muslim. When people respond to our sharing about Jesus, I’ve learned that we cannot expect them to immediately change their whole life for their new beliefs. In fact, it is all right for them to bring Jesus into their culture and traditions and see what beautiful things result. –Clarissa