World Refugee Day–Faith over Fear

19 06 2019

Praying With RefugeesA bomb threat at the hotel where we were supposed to teach English caused us to cancel our classes one day. Thankfully, there was no bomb, and we could carry on teaching English here in Indonesia.

That’s the closest I’ve come to a bomb.

I’ve never watched missiles fall from the sky and wipe out my city.

I’ve never watched my apartment building crumble in a cloud of smoke, and wonder where I could go to be safe.

I’ve never lost track of family members—not knowing if they were killed in the mass destruction, or lying wounded somewhere, or taken to a refugee camp with no way of contacting them.

I’ve never been forced to leave everything I know and flee to a foreign land, giving up my dreams of the life I wanted for the new goal of just staying alive.

I’ve never been a refugee.

June 20th is World Refugee Day. It’s a time to take our eyes off ourselves for a moment, and consider our hurting “neighbors.”

Last year on June 20th, the United Nations reported that 2017 had record numbers of refugees around the world, 68.5 million people. That’s a new person displaced every two seconds.

God’s heart for refugees cannot be ignored. In the Bible, when a neighboring nation like Moab (modern-day west Jordan, but at the time an enemy to Israel) was attacked and had to flee their homes as refugees, God let us in on his emotions in Isaiah 15-16: “Oh, how I grieve for Moab! Refugees stream to Zoar…” The Moabites beg Judah, “Give the refugees from Moab sanctuary with you. Be a safe place for those on the run from the killing fields.” And God responds, “I’ll join the weeping. I’ll weep right along with Jazer, weep for the Sibmah vineyards. And yes, Heshbon and Elealeh, I’ll mingle my tears with your tears!” (Message translation)

Jesus himself was a refugee. His family fled Herod’s killing spree for the safety of Egypt. Aren’t we all glad Egypt took Jesus in, and didn’t turn him back at the border?

Taking in a refugee family can be a scary step of faith. Just ask Wolfgang and Chantal Massing, who were hesitant at first to disrupt their comfortable lives, but their faith in Christ prevailed. They invited a Syrian refugee family into their home and their hearts.

I love Chantal’s challenge to all of us: “Trusting more than fearing has got to be learned.”

On June 20th, what can we do to celebrate World Refugee Day?

  • Pray for refugee families, for peace in their homelands, for just immigration laws that welcome the hurting and the stranger.
  • If you know a refugee family, reach out to love them today.
  • Check to see if there are organizations in your city that help refugees, and ask them how you can get involved. Chantal started by donating items—she wound up with a gorgeous Syrian baby who called her “Grandma.”
  • Contact your government officials in support of legislation that helps refugees (ask me for more information if you’re interested).

My family has been blessed living in Indonesia by a wonderful Muslim family that took us in to live with them our first 3 months here, helping us to figure out how to do life in a whole new world. They became like a second family for us. Where would we be today without them?

Their kindness is exactly what Jesus expects of his followers when he charges us, “For I was hungry and you gave me food, I was thirsty and you gave me drink, I was a stranger and you welcomed me…Truly, I say to you, as you did it to one of the least of these my brothers, you did it to me.” (Matthew 25:35-40 ESV)





International Day of Peace — And a Special Offer

17 09 2017
The United Nations has declared this Thursday, September 21, as an International Day of Peace. The theme this year is “Together for Peace: Respect, Safety and Dignity for All.” Special attention will be directed toward displaced peoples.
UN Secretary-General António Guterres offers this exhortation: “In times of insecurity, communities that look different become convenient scapegoats. We must resist cynical efforts to divide communities and portray neighbours as ‘the other’. Discrimination diminishes us all. It prevents people — and societies — from achieving their full potential.” He added, “Together, let us stand up against bigotry and for human rights. Together, let us build bridges. Together, let us transform fear into hope.”
Check out this short video of Yusra, a Syrian refugee who competed in the most recent Olympics! She wouldn’t have made it without the help of others. Now more than other, the world is recognizing that Jesus’ directive to “love your neighbor” is our world’s only hope.
My friend Rebecca took a risk and loved her neighbors this week in Columbus, OH, where angry protesters threatened Muslims going to their Friday noon prayers at the mosque. Rebecca took her baby and rallied some friends to stand together on the sidewalk as a human barrier just to make sure her Muslim neighbors could navigate the protest safely.
The protesters, a group by the name of “Real Street Preachers,” used a bullhorn and the Bible to condemn the Muslims and graphically insult anyone who stood with the Muslims.

Rebecca writes about a man near her who shouted, “Muslims go to hell… So how many wives do you have, sir? The first one is for beating, the second one you use to cook, the third wife cleans and the fourth one is for sex. You don’t know the words of Jesus. John 14:9! Jesus said, ‘If you’ve seen me, you’ve seen the Father!’ Jesus is God!” He cried out, with his arms in the air, “He’s gonna throw you into hell one day, sinner. He’s gonna throw you into hell one day, Muslim. He’s gonna throw you [looking at Rebecca] into hell one day, whore, lezbo. You don’t know the Bible!”

Rebecca adds, “At one point, I was able to have some reasonable conversation with one protesting man, about 40 years old. As I looked into his calm blue eyes, I thought, ‘He looks so normal.’

“Later, describing it to a friend I said, ‘If I met him in Starbucks, I’d not know he was any different than me.’ He spoke with me, vacillating between a level tone and yelling at passersby, ‘I’ve been doing this since 2010. I know you guys don’t see it this way, but we are loving them… Muslims go to hell! …It’s tough love… You’re all going to hell!’

Just like Jesus, Rebecca chose to express her love by standing against the Pharisees throwing stones and standing with the condemned woman; by choosing self-sacrifice that others might be free. I just hope the Muslims affected by this event go home knowing the true Jesus through Rebecca’s love rather than the crass, condemning Jesus of the “Real Street Preachers.”
SPECIAL OFFER — All my e-books are half price this week for International Day of Peace!
If you’ve read one of my books but haven’t picked up the other two yet, this week only all 3 e-books are on sale half price! That means Someone Has to Die (Peace Trilogy Book 1) is only 99 cents, while A Way Out of Hell (Peace Trilogy Book 2) and A Violent Light (Peace Trilogy Book 3) are only $1.99 each!
Let’s all celebrate this International Day of Peace by loving someone different from us, and coming TOGETHER.